Common Causes of Testicular Torsion

Common Causes of Testicular Torsion

Testicular torsion is a condition that affects the testicles and can lead to infertility if not treated quickly. The testicles are attached to the scrotum by a piece of tissue called the spermatic cord. This cord contains blood vessels and nerves. Testicular torsion happens when this cord becomes twisted, cutting off the blood supply to the testicle. Without treatment, the testicle will die. In this blog post, we will discuss the causes of testicular torsion, how it is diagnosed and treated.

Congenital Factors

There are several congenital factors that can predispose a man to testicular torsion. One such factor is a condition called “bell clapper” deformity, which allows the testicles to move freely within the scrotum. Bell clapper deformity increases the risk of the spermatic cord becoming twisted and is responsible for 90% of testicular torsion cases. Another congenital factor is undescended testicles. This occurs when the testicles do not descend into the scrotum before birth. This can cause the testicles to be more mobile and susceptible to torsion.

Genetics

testicular torsion

Testicular torsion can also run in families. Having a family history of testicular torsion makes it more likely the one will experience the condition themselves. In most cases, this is because the bell clapper deformity is passed on.

Injury

Injury to the scrotum or testicles can also lead to testicular torsion. One of the most common injuries that leads to testicular torsion is a direct blow to the scrotum. This can happen during sports or other activities. Strenuous exercise or movement can also cause testicular torsion in some cases. Surgery on the testicles or scrotum can also lead to torsion. The risk of torsion is increased if the surgery is done on only one testicle.

Rapid Testicular Growth

Rapid growth can also cause testicular torsion. This often happens during puberty when the testicles are growing quickly. Testicular torsion is more common in teenage boys between the ages of 12-18.

How is Testicular Torsion Diagnosed and Treated?

Testicular torsion is usually diagnosed based on the symptoms. The most common symptom is sudden, severe pain in the testicle. The pain is often described as excruciating. Other symptoms include nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. The testicle may also be swollen and tender.

If testicular torsion is suspected, it is important to seek medical attention immediately. Testicular torsion is a medical emergency and needs to be treated as soon as possible. If not treated quickly, the testicle will die and the man will be at risk for infertility.

Treatment for testicular torsion involves surgery known as orchiopexy. Orchiopexy is a surgical procedure that is used to fix testicular torsion. This procedure involves untwisting the spermatic cord and then stitching the cord to the scrotum to prevent it from twisting again. This is usually done within six hours of the onset of symptoms. The sooner the surgery is done, the better the chances of saving the testicle.

In Conclusion

Testicular torsion is a condition that can have serious consequences if not treated quickly. In this blog post, we have discussed the causes of testicular torsion, how it is diagnosed and treated. If you think you or someone you know may have testicular torsion, it is important to seek medical attention immediately. With prompt treatment, the chances of saving the testicle are good.

Dr Kerem Bortecen

Dr. Kerem H. Bortecen received his PhD degree in England at Oxford University and his MBA degree in Canada at the University of Toronto. After completing his training at Yale University then at the University of Pennsylvania, he was appointed as an Assistant Professor of Surgery at Dartmouth Medical School. His academic achievements have been instrumental in establishing Soho Men’s Health at the forefront of this evolving field. Dr. Bortecen fulfills his mission through surgical excellence, personalized medicine, and continuity of care.

Dr Kerem Bortecen

Dr. Kerem H. Bortecen received his PhD degree in England at Oxford University and his MBA degree in Canada at the University of Toronto. After completing his training at Yale University then at the University of Pennsylvania, he was appointed as an Assistant Professor of Surgery at Dartmouth Medical School. His academic achievements have been instrumental in establishing Soho Men’s Health at the forefront of this evolving field. Dr. Bortecen fulfills his mission through surgical excellence, personalized medicine, and continuity of care.

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